Articles tagged with: will and grace

A Trip to the Queer Circus: Reimagined Masculinities in Will & Grace

on Sunday, 05 June 2011. Posted in Student Notes

NOTES PREPARED BY DANE ARGENTIERI

In Richard J. Conway’s essay, he discusses how the hetero-normative depictions of masculinity are never threatened even on a show, Will & Grace, that has two male, homosexual characters. He discusses situation comedies (sit-coms) as a whole, how reflect the reality of contemporary social issues but “allows its audience to both recognize its particular social framework and simultaneously distance itself from those standards”. This distancing process (the unreal or the anti-state), along with the comedic aspect of the show – referred to as the carnival by Bakhtin- allows audiences to accept the radical "reimagined states of masculinity become temporarily acceptable within the Bakhtin carnival because these virtual “othered” males are so queered as to be humorous and disempowered as to be disabled. This “disempowerment prevents them from re-creating and renegotiating masculinity and its relations outside the (non)delineations of the carnival".

A Trip to the Queer Circus: Reimagined Masculinities in Will and Grace

on Tuesday, 24 May 2011. Posted in Student Notes

NOTES PREPARED BY AARON ARKIN

Richard Conway's article describes how the different representations of masculinity on the TV show Will and Grace are made possible by the carnivalesque nature of the sitcom. Sitcoms are believed to be spaces where unrealistic characters and situations become real, which makes characters like Jack seem believable as an extremely "camp" homosexual. Will's character, who perceived as straight, dispels the notion that all gay men are flamboyant like Jack's character. Bakhtin's definition of carnivale results in a character like Jack being "disempowered, and disabled"